About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
MSNBCW 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
the difference of one single person can make in our world. she encourages the women of liberia to organize and fight for peace. that was the most important factor in the remarkable rise of backer's first female head of state. when she joined us back then to discuss her book, we had no idea that 48 hours after that conversation, she would go on to be awarded the nobel peace prize. let me start with this " on the back of the book. "she helped bring liberia out of the dark. her memoir is a captivating near to that will stand as testament to the power of women, face, and the spirit of our great country. it is written by the first woman president of liberia. i was honored to have the president's on the program. i asked her a question about what being a woman did for her, however challenge her in becoming the first woman president of liberia. i would not have been able to speak out in the manner i did. the forceful positions i took, i think came from the fact that as a woman i felt i could speak. there is no way she would become president of women like you do not pave the way for that to happen.
consiste en enseñar sobre muchas especies desconocidas para la inmensa mayoría. liberia, la hipopótamo pigmea enviada desde el zoológico de fuengirola es una de ellas. junto con su madre, entra al río por primera vez. para su sorpresa se encuentra rodeada de muchos animales extraños que comparten el mismo recinto. ♪ existe una creencia que afecta a los zoológicos, ésta manifiesta que los animales no deben ser sacados de su hábitat natural para ser llevados a un parque zoológico. pero ningún zoológico que pertenece a la generación actual trata con animales que han sido atrapados en la selva. como liberia, la mayoría han llegado desde otros zoológicos europeos donde nacieron para encontrarse con una reproducción del hábitat natural de su especie. ♪ estos nuevos parques son una parte imprescindible de la conservación de los bosques tropicales. aquí el público empieza a interesarse por las especies y sus ecosistemas. miembros de este público, alejados de la selva y su realidad habitan en países que cuentan con fondos para sustentar los esfuerzos por la conservación.
the trans national spiritual community first from liberia. and very few people talk about the committee that this jury how this community uses it as a base to connect from five different continents. that this chain of begin restaurants throughout united states to use this technology to build this transnational community. and to bring that to a wider audience. >> host: it will be several months before is published? >> guest: it will come up the end of 2013. >> host: talking to professor john jackson, jr.. here is the book "racial paranoia" the unintended consequences of political correctness" this is booktv on c-span2. >> host: booktv on c-span2 on location at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. at the annenberg school of communication currently joining us is the theme michael x. delli carpini what is the annenberg school of communication? >> we do research for the public consumption and a ph.d. training and graduate training that media and communication influence social practice and health and cultural practice. >> we're here to talk about your book "after broadcast news" me
to the african continent where she visited liberia, ghana and the ivory coast. the primary mission of the trip was to participate in the inauguration of william holder, the new president of liberia. for the first time, the first lady would be the official representative of the united states. as such, pat met privately with the president as well as prime e prime minister and the president of ghana and the president -- sorry, of the ivory coast. i think i just murdered their names, for which i apologize. her official party of 40 included the reverend billy graham. he and tolbert were both ministers, and mrs. john h. johnson, the wife of the president of johnson publishing company. in addition to official meetings, press conferences and speeches before political parties, the africans treated pat and her entourage to a whirlwind of dippers, receptions -- dippers, receptions and presentations. pat took her responsibilities on the trip very seriously. duly noted in the biography that pat snuck away on christmas day to go over her briefing notes to organize her thoughts for the upcoming trip. althoug
of african-americans that left chicago in 1967, fled to liberia, and then eventually to southern israel, and by '69 they made it to southern israel and have been there ever since. very few people talk about this community. what was once 400 people who left are now 34 hundred, and it's a story about how the community in israel uses that as a base to connect with community members on five different continentses all over the world. there's a change of folks throughout the united states and i'm interested in how they use the media technology to build this transnational spiritual community, and it's a fascinating story that few people know about. so it would be fun to bring that to hopefully a wide audience. >> host: you're finishing it but self months before at it published. >> guest: not until the end of 2013. >> host: we have been talking with university of pennsylvania professor dr. john l. jackson, jr., here's the book. racial pair nowa, the unintended consequences of political correctness, this is book tv on c-span2. >> now from the university of pennsylvania. we discuss the new media
and liberia. an issue for nigeria, in the north of the country they have been fighting against an islamist insurgency for the past few months. it's been a very difficult fight. they say that has given them relevant experience. what's clear is this conflict in mali is becoming international. >> that was from the north of nigeria. our security correspondent is with me now. gordon, we erred from the japanese prime minister earlier talking about all the things that he wants done. there are crisis meetings going on all over the planet. what options do leaders have? >> very few good options. this is one of the most complicated hostage crises you can imagine. an incredibly remote location in algeria, a gas facility, heavily armed militants have been pretty good weaponry and potentially having explosives around or even .n some of the hostages, apar and you have britain, norway, japan, america, algeria, all these countries trying to negotiate a response. the algerian is likely will be in the lead, because they are the ones on the ground. it is a fluid situation. things have been going on even today
. >> greg: if we were liberia or greece i could understand listening to this guy. we are the greatest country that has ever been and probably ever will be. he says to discard the outdated document to make the greatest country it will be. what is it about the academic that look at fruit and causes of the victory and wants to sacrifice them and embrace the ideas of history? >> bob: you missed your normal opening. look at that guy. the entire left is like that. the entire left. >> greg: i like that guy. he is honest and constitutional professor. >> kimberly: but they all say that. have you met a constitutional law professor that doesn't say that? that doesn't want everyone to challenge the law, walk in the class naked for the nude, you know, cases. i had that happen. >> dana: what? >> greg: trying to get you to do that. >> eric: academia leans left. >> bob: that's right, tall left looks like that guy. >> greg: that guy is not for gun control. that is the interesting thing about the professor. >> eric: he is a georgetown law professor. >> dana: i thought his hair was fascinating. >> eric:
speech before a joint session of congress. she's the president of liberia, ellen johnson serley. i was sitting in liberia. i said to her, james madison, by design, said this is to be an ugly, messy, difficult process. i'll never forget how she looked at me and said, david, you've forgotten one thing. yes, it is an ugly, messy, difficult process but you have to add the fact that it works. and as difficult as it has been to get to this point, we need to realize that it's an ugly, messy, difficult process, this is a very small step, it's a first step in our quest for tax reform and entitlement reform which will get us back onto a path toward economic growth and the kind of prosperity that we want and that the american people deserve and it will create a greater degree of certainty, we all know that uncertainty is the enemy of prosperity and so making permanent these tax cuts for 99% of the american people is a very important step in our quest to ep sure that there is that degree of -- to ensure that there is a degree of certainty. mr. speaker, i will say again that i do associate myse
-time ally, liberia's president ellen johnson surleaf. >> it's important to be here today to see that you have fully recovered from your recent illness. >>> on "today" chelsea clinton speaks for the first time about her mom's recovery. >> she is exuding the energy, the vibrancy, and certainly the mental acuty that she always has. i am so grateful that she is not only fine, but healthy and vibrant and strong and, you know, god willing, will be for the next 65 years of her life. >> and chelsea clinton is also chairing the national day of service on saturday. more on that to come. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the political cavalry has arrived. new york senator chuck schumer has given his seal of approval to president obama's defense nominee. any decision that could rally senate democrats and signal an easier path to confirmation for former senator chuck hagel. joining us now washington post columnist greta -- white house correspondent kristen welker. welcome both. kristen, what is the white house, breathing a huge sigh of relief now that they've reeled chuck schumer in o
colony of liberia where some people of african descent were being repatriated, and here is what is called the killing this coast. limbo was the name of the slave trading fortress. here are the men day for the red , closer to the coast. it but this basically is the region were almost all of them came from. now, what kind of experiences did they have? it turns out one of the most important things that all of the men killed all 49 of the men had in common, they were trained warriors. it turned out that southern sierra leone in the 1830's was wracked by warfare, apparently because this group in tandem with southern slave traders in this region have gone into the interior making more and capturing people to bring them back to the coast to sell, to be transported to places like cuba and brazil especially. so understanding that these people were warriors helps you to see why they might have been successful in carrying off this rebellion that actually prove to be a very important fact. this is an image of a warrior from the same time. it says a warrior with poisoned arrows. i show you this image
for a trip to liberia and it gave me an opportunity to see up close your arcable skills and stamina and determination. in my view it helped restore america's credibility and build bridges with international partners and built bridges here on the hill where your leadership is respected on both sides of the aisle and widely praised. while senator kerry has my full confidence, you will be deeply missed. you said in your opening statement, you're determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger and more secure and in my view because of your leadership, they are. today we continue the consideration of the advisory review board which found that security was quote grossly inadequate to deal with the attack on benghazi. the mistakes that were made are simply unacceptable. i'm pleased that the state department has gun to promptly implement the board's recommendations thanks to your leadership. i know you agree the massive security failures such as those witnessed in benghazi that cost the lives of four brave americans, simply cannot happen again. i look forward to wor
an immigrant to the u.s.? caller: yes, but a legal immigrant. i'm from liberia. host: our caller is talking about why is it different for someone who immigrated in the 60's versus today? and what does it mean to be an american? guest: we as a country have had a long and sometimes good and sometimes difficult relationship with immigrants. we have gone from the days of the irish need not apply and the chinese exclusion act to the immigration and naturalization act of 1955. even the previous caller spoke on this. we reached a bubbling moment within the country and then saner heads prevailed and we were actually able to fix our immigration system. what it means to be american is if you believe in family, you believe in hard work and opportunity and freedom. that's why my parents came to parents and mark's all across. host: where is your family from? guest: >> pakistan. host: you're born in the u.s.? guest: >> yes. at the end of the day, being american is defining who we are as a people and as a society. it's up to congress to get its act together. host: a tweet -- guest: that was a requirement
you've traveled and one of the countries we visited was a trip we shared jointly to like bee liberia. it gave me as a tpwrerb man senatofreshman senator to see your remarkable skills. you built bridges with our international partners, and on the hill where your leadership is respected on both side of the aisle and has been praised. while senator kerry has my full confidence you will be missed. you want to leave our country, safer, stronger and more secure, and in my view because of your leadership we are. today we continue the considerations of the advisory review board which found that security was quote, gross lee inadequate to deal with the attack that took place in benghazi in september. the mistakes that were made are simply unacceptable, and i'm pleased that the state department has begun to promptly implement the board's recommendations thanks to your leadership. i know you agree that the massive security failure such as those witnessed in benghazi that cost the lives of four brave americans simply cannot happen again and i look forward to working with my colleagues on this co
it will recover. i want to thank you for your remarkable work. we shared a joint stock -- stop in liberia to celebrate the presidency of ellen sirleaf johnson. it gave me an opportunity to see your remarkable skills and stamina and dterminateterminati. in my view, your leadership has helped restore america's credibility. he had also built bridges here on the hill -- you have also built bridges here on the hill. while your likely successor has my full confidence, you will be deeply missed. he said in your opening statement you are determined to leave our country safer, a more secure. in my view because of your leadership, they are. the review board found security was grossly inadequate to deal with the attack that took place in benghazi. the mistakes that were made are unacceptable and i am pleased as the department will document recommendations -- implement recommendations. i know you agree that the massive security failures cannot happen again. i look forward to working with my colleagues on this committee in a review of the resources needed and the state department structure to ensure t
to help our countrymen port their liberias together. we did it here in the snavment but the house walked away, just like they did with postal reform, just like they did with agricultural reform, our farm bill, and like they've walked away from so many different things this year. they left these people without help. they're gone. they've left. they're not in washington. and i'm disappointed we've turned our books -- and i don't include me in this operation or anyone ha in this 123459 -- buti am deeply disappointed that the house of representatives have turned their backs on people who are suffering. and please understand everybody, this does not include the leadership of leader pelosi, leader hoyer. they've done their best to gather their troops to help anytime anything is needed. but it's not who we should be as americans. just to walk away from these people. wintertime is now there. when disaster strikes, fire, floods, storm, or earthquake, we in the past haven't paused and we don't delay. but we have here. as men's we respond -- as americans we respond with haste when american lives ar
it will recover. for your thank yolu remarkable work. we shared a joint stock -- stop in liberia to celebrate the presidency of ellen sirleaf johnson. in my view, your leadership has helped restore america's credibility. he had also built bridges here on the hill -- you have also built bridges here on the hill. you will be deeply missed. he said in your opening statement you are determined to leave our country safer, a more secure. in my view because of your leadership, they are. the review board found security was grossly inadequate to deal with the attack that took place in benghazi. the mistakes that were made are unacceptable and i am pleased as the department will document recommendations -- recommendations. i look forward to working with my colleagues on this committee in a review of the resources needed and the state department structure to ensure that we do better to protect our diplomats and other americans who put their lives at risk every day. as chairman of the africa subcommittee, i am pleased you have drawn for us today billings ks.ween -- the linjk i chaired a heaing in mali on
is -- liberia? i am so tired of hearing about israel. i do not live in israel. maybe some of those guys are double agents up there, but we need some people that think about america first. >> gene, joining us from lindbergh, montana, good afternoon. you are on the air. please go ahead. >> i have been listening and watching intently, taking notes on what has been said and ask, and i am really disturbed about chuck hagel. a leopard does not change his spots, and i am a firm believer in that. i have some tough questions if i could ask him myself, and whether it is the democrats or the republicans asking the questions, it is not the time for anybody to run and hide and say they do not know or they do not recall. that is all i have to say. >> calvin, durham, north carolina, day one of the confirmation hearings. you are on the air. >> yes, john mccain appears to be a sore loser, still bitter about his loss in the election. president barack obama won the election. i do not understand why he cannot have who he wants in his cabinet. >> we are getting comments on the facebook page. one says confir
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)